Advertising

Ironage: Keep Improving Campaign

Ironage_1

In a marketing campaign created by Y&R, Sao Paolo, Brazil. Ironage, an isotonic sports drink made in Brazil, targeted athletes who constantly strive to exceed their own personal best. In addition to print ads featuring athletes, Y&R promoted the brand strategically in places where customers were most likely to congregate – namely, gyms, parks, and health clubs. There, they introduced vending machines, dubbed “Pulse Machines.” Consistent with the brand’s slogan “Keep Moving,” the machines read the customer’s heart rate with each use. The higher their heart rate, the bigger their discount on a bottle of Ironage. The Pulse Machine challenged the competitive spirit of these athletes and turned them into word-of-mouth promoters of the brand as they compared their pulse readings.
Read More »

Architecture

Iconic Styles of Renowned Architects From A to Z

Argentine architect Andrea Stinga and Colombian graphic designer Federico Gonzalez put together this animated video of globally renowned architects and their most notable work. The minute-and-a-half long video manages to squeeze in a lot of information, including architects and landmarks from around the world. Still, art director Gonzalez apologizes that some legends had to be left out because they only needed one architect per letter of the alphabet. Stinga is a principal in Ombu Architecture, based in Barcelona, Spain. The music soundtrack is “The Butterfly” by Eugene C. Rose and George Ruble.

Packaging

How Do You Package a Fruit-Flavored Drink?

Smirnoff Fruit

JWT Brazil let the distinguishing flavors of Caipiroska, the Brazilian drink that is popular worldwide, lead it to the solution for the packaging of Smirnoff’s new beverage. It wrapped each bottle with the texture of the fruit flavor (lime, passion fruit and strawberry) inside and used a diagonal perforation to let customers peel away the outer “skin”. For a select mailing list, JWT even sent packaged Smirnoff Caipiroska sets in wooden produce crates.

The Smirnoff packaging is in the vanguard of integrating textures into print. Today more designers are utilizing the amazing capabilities of dimensional printing and Adobe software to create raster-textured images. No longer do viewers have to imagine the tactile quality of an object, they can actually feel it by running their fingers across a printed sheet. It’s not just movies that are embracing 3-D; the print medium is too.

Read More »

Illustration

Saying a Lot in a Little Space

Fernando Volken Togni, a 27-year-old designer from Porto Alegre, Brazil, illustrated this series of colorful drawings for Qatar Airways’ Oryx Magazine. Each illustration presents 24-hours in the life of a world-renowned city by presenting iconic scenes of the city through an assemblage of pictograph-style shapes. Togni also expresses each city in a different color palette to convey its cultural uniqueness. Especially when viewed in an international airline magazine, this illustration says a lot without the use of a single word – or the need for translation.

Read More »

Product Design

Philatelic Pursuits

Whether the trend is being driven by improved automated postal sorting machines or the insatiable demand of stamp collectors for ever-more novel designs is unclear, but lately more nations are issuing commemorative stamps that arouse the urge to lick, sniff and touch.

Austria has been a pioneer in this area. In addition to joining forces with Austria’s famed Swarovski Crystal to create a swan stamp imbedded with bits of real glass crystal, the Austrian post office honored the UEFA European Championship by creating a soccer ball stamp out of a synthetic mix of rubbery polyurethane. To immortalize Andi Herzog’s winning soccer goal in the 1998 World Cup, it put a three-second moving image of the goal on a postage stamp, and to honor simultaneously a native craft and national flora, Austria issued embroidered stamps featuring its Edelweiss and Clusius flowers.

Read More »

Advertising

A City Without Billboards

In January 2007, Sao Paolo, Brazil, did something that would send chills down the spine of most ad agencies. In an effort to rid the city of what the mayor called “visual pollution,” Sao Paolo enacted a Clean City law that banned all billboards and most other large outdoor advertising.

Known as one of the world’s worst billboard jungles, Sao Paolo was rife with illegal billboards and signs. Advertisers had bought up virtually all available street and wall space in the city to hang their gigantic marketing messages. To earn money, some poor residents even sold the front of their homes or space in their gardens to post ad signs. Unable to determine which were legal and which not, the city banned them all.

Since the law went into effect more than 15,000 billboards, 1,600 oversized signs and 1,300 metal ad panels have come down. Strict regulations mandated smaller storefront signage and limited them to hang only above the store entrance and not extend into the street. Even pamphleteering in public spaces was made illegal. Those who didn’t comply faced hefty fines.

Read More »

Advertising

“For A Less Painful World” Brazilian Ad

asprin

From Almap BBDO in Sao Paolo, Brazil, comes these outdoor poster advertisements for Bayer Aspirin. The inspiration of Almap chief creative director Marcello Serpa, art director Marcos Medeiros and illustrator Jose Cortizo Junior, these lushly drawn “Sanskrit” paintings feature a silhouetted man and woman in the traditional meditative lotus pose, with an aspirin used in place of a mystical “third eye” of calm. Outside the inner circle of serenity are vignette scenes of stress – warring kids pulling apart a teddy bear, a teenager banging on his drum set, a dentist by his empty chair, a worker using a jackhammer, a man rubbing his aching neck. The ad won the 2009 Cannes Lion Bronze for Outdoor advertising. Ohm shanti ohm. May you find peace in a chaotic world.